This process is now available in gNewSense 3 Installation Manual

Note that the process of creating a Live USB stick is now integrated into the Installation Manual for gNewSense 3.

Booting From USB

If you got a USB memory stick you can boot gNewSense live as with the cd. What you will need:

Make your stick bootable

This will guide you to make the stick bootable. We are going to use syslinux for it.

Setup for gNewSense 3.0 from a running GNU/Linux

Since the gNewSense 3.0 CD image is released, one can setup a bootable USB stick with such an ISO image. When both the USB stick and the ISO image are not mounted, the stick can be set up by the instruction given in the Debian FAQ (directly copying the contents of the *.iso onto the stick with the dd program), when it was FAT32 partitioned and formatted.

Install syslinux for older gNewSense Releases

Choose the operating system you run. GNU/Linux or Windows.

GNU/Linux

Syslinux may already be installed in your system. Type syslinux in a terminal. If the command is not found you have to install it from your distribution's repository. On a Debian/Ubuntu system this is done like this:

apt-get install syslinux

You can also run the following commands in a terminal:

wget http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/boot/syslinux/syslinux-3.83.tar.bz2
tar -xvjf syslinux-3.83.tar.bz2
cd syslinux-3.83/unix

Now you got syslinux ready to use. Keep the terminal window up so you can use it later.

Windows

Install mbr

GNU/Linux

mbr may already be installed in your system. Type install-mbr in a root terminal. If the command is not found you have to install it from your distribution's repository. On a Debian/Ubuntu system this is done like this:

apt-get install mbr

Partition the stick

Usually USB sticks are already partitioned with a FAT partition. If your USB stick is completely empty, you need to use fdisk to partition it:

mocca:~# fdisk /dev/sdf
Device contains neither a valid DOS partition table, nor Sun, SGI or OSF disklabel
Building a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0x85934366.
Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
After that, of course, the previous content won't be recoverable.

Warning: invalid flag 0x0000 of partition table 4 will be corrected by w(rite)

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sdf: 2021 MB, 2021654528 bytes
63 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1010 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 3906 * 512 = 1999872 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x85934366

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

Command (m for help): n
Command action
   e   extended
   p   primary partition (1-4)
p
Partition number (1-4): 1
First cylinder (1-1010, default 1): 
Using default value 1
Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1-1010, default 1010): 
Using default value 1010

Command (m for help): t
Selected partition 1
Hex code (type L to list codes): b
Changed system type of partition 1 to b (W95 FAT32)

Command (m for help): a
Partition number (1-4): 1

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sdf: 2021 MB, 2021654528 bytes
63 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1010 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 3906 * 512 = 1999872 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x85934366

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdf1   *           1        1010     1972499    b  W95 FAT32

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered!

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.

WARNING: If you have created or modified any DOS 6.x
partitions, please see the fdisk manual page for additional
information.
Syncing disks.
mocca:~# 

Format the stick

Again, usually USB sticks are already formatted. If you want to-reformat it, you can do it like this:

In GNU/Linux:

mkfs.vfat /dev/sdf1

Run syslinux

Run the syslinux command shown below, in the window we set up earlier, assuming drive name is sdb1 or F:.

In GNU/Linux:

syslinux -s /dev/sdb1

In Windows:

syslinux.exe -s -m F:

Install the master boot record

The master boot record must be installed on

In GNU/Linux:

install-mbr /dev/sdb

Mount the stick

In the most modern operating systems USB memory sticks get mounted automatically.

If not and if you use a GNU/Linux distribution run mount:

mount /dev/sdb1 /media/usb

You have to run the command as root or sudo. You also have to create the directory usb with mkdir /media/usb, or choose a mount point at your opinion. The device name may also be different. Run dmesg | tail in a terminal after you have plugged in the stick. Look for [sdb] or any similar. Add a 1 to it so it knows it is the first partition.

Copy files from the gNewSense iso

Download a gNewSense iso from http://cdimage.gnewsense.org/ You can burn the iso to a cd and copy the files to the stick, but it is faster to mount the iso.

In GNU/Linux:

mkdir /media/iso
mount -o loop /path/to/gnewsense-livecd-deltah-2.3.iso /media/iso

Again, it has to be done as root or sudo.

Copy the casper directory to the memory stick. Copy the content of the isolinux directory to the memory stick. Rename isolinux.bin to syslinux.bin. Rename isolinux.cfg to syslinux.cfg.

In GNU/Linux:

cp -r /media/iso/casper/ /media/usb/
cp /media/iso/isolinux/* /media/usb/
mv /media/usb/isolinux.bin /media/usb/syslinux.bin
mv /media/usb/isolinux.cfg /media/usb/syslinux.cfg

Unmount the memory stick to write cache. In GNU/Linux:

umount /media/usb

Unmount the ISO image. In GNU/Linux:

umount /media/iso

Memory sticks not automounted-fix

If you installed gNewSense from the memory stick the same memory stick is not automatically mounted. This is caused by the stick being added to the fstab file. Plug in your memory stick and check in dmesg what it got for a device name.

 dmesg | tail

Then edit fstab and remove the line containing the device name.

 sudo gedit /etc/fstab

For example: /dev/sdb1 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0 0

Documentation/BootingFromUSB (last edited 2013-09-05 18:46:52 by samgee2)